Food swaps that will make you healthier

Susan Hunter Children's Health, Digestive Health, Mental Health Leave a Comment

A few simple changes when you are shopping to fill the pantry and fridge could make all the difference to how well you feel over time. Knowing what the healthier option is in a world of crappy foods at the shops can help guide you to make some good food decisions next time you shop.

Milk chocolate for dark chocolate

Next time you are at the supermarket reach out for the dark chocolate has more antioxidants and is less adulterated than milk chocolate. Skip the extra dairy and sugar you don’t need more of. And the darker the better!

Cous cous & bulgur for Quinoa

Similar in size so replacing it in recipes is easy. Quinoa contains all the essential amino acids you require and is an anti-inflammatory pseudo-seed/grain.

White rice for brown rice or red rice or wild rice

Coloured rices have a higher polyphenol content which your gut bacteria love. Even just eating brown rice instead of white rice is better for you because it still has the outer husk on it which is the vitamin and mineral rich part of the rice.

Iceberg lettuce for dark leafy greens

Switch to silverbeet, kale and spinach to get a big hit of active folate, vitamin A, C, E, K, B vitamins and don’t get me started on the list of minerals they contain. Leafy greens are also the way to go to reduce your systemic acidity and get your body more alkaline.

Cow’s milk for coconut milk

Just as creamy and contains the healthy medium chain triglyceride fats that are more easily absorbed, then metabolised in the liver and used for energy.

White potato for sweet potato

Sweet potato is a more nutrient dense and lower GI potato. They contain more antioxidants than white potato and their starches help feed our beneficial bacteria in our gut too.

Margarine for avocado

Go for a healthy fat that mother nature makes to top that toast or cracker. Avocado is rich in fibre (1/2 an avo has more fibre than a bowl of oatmeal), folate, vitamin E, potassium and magnesium. There is nothing healthy or natural about margarine.

Susan Hunter
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Susan Hunter

B.Hsc (Naturopathy), B.A. (Psych) at Healthful Clinic - Founder and Director
Susan Hunter is a double-degree qualified naturopath, a published academic author and the founder of Healthful Clinic. She writes widely on mental health, digestive conditions and children's health.
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